Photobucket

CREATION ART

****
  • Photobucket Songs of Earth's Creations. In an endless cycle of eons she creates and destroys masterpieces, reusing her building materials to create anew. From death comes life.Photobucket
  • ****

    ..........................................

    Saturday, December 19, 2009

     

    Nature Creates Wierd and Wonderful





    Australia creatures

    Labels:


    Sunday, December 06, 2009

     

    Thirty Thousand Feet - Weather, Sunsets

    Sunset Over Hawaii
















    Sunset Over Corpus Christi, Texas
















    Sunset Over St. Croix, VI
















    WaterSpout Over St. Croix, VI
















    Storm System Over Flint, Michigan
















    Sunset Over Talkeetna, Arkansas
















    Sunset Over Everglades City, Florida
















    Sunset Over Daytona Beach, Florida
















    Clouds Over Dallas, Texas
















    30,000 Feet Above McKinley Park, Arkansas
















    Sunset Over Denver, Colorado
















    Sunset Over Nashville, Tennessee
















    Sunset Over Macon, Georgia
















    30,000 Feet Above Sierra Nevada Mts.
















    Sunset or Sunrise Space Shuttle Launch
















    30,000 Feet Over Chicago, Illinois
















    Sunset Storm Over Minneapolis, Minnesota
















    Sunset Over North Sea
















    Sunset Over Logan, Ohio
















    Sunset Over Denver, Colorado
















    Sunset Over Denver, Colorado-2

















    Rain Clouds Over Albuquerque, New Mexico



    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Labels: ,


    Wednesday, November 25, 2009

     

    Deep Ocean Life Creations

    Glowing Crystal Jellies


    ..........................................................................................................

    Photo Gallery: Ocean Survey Reveals World of Deep-Sea Creatures



    May 11, 2006—This heart-shaped jellyfish, called a comb jelly, was among thousands of tiny creatures captured in an expedition conducted last month to collect and catalog the world's deep-sea denizens.

    The 20-day mission, sponsored by the international research group Census of Marine Life, brought 28 leading marine experts from 14 countries together in the Sargasso Sea, an area of the North Atlantic near the Bermuda Triangle.

    The scientists used scuba divers and highly specialized nets and trawls to collect specimens from the ocean's deepest waters, 0.6 to 3 miles (1 to 5 kilometers) below the surface.

    The researchers used a special onboard DNA sequencer to analyze more than 220 organisms, and at least a dozen new species were identified.

    The research trip was funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and organized by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

    Photograph by Larry Madin, courtesy UAF/NOAA/Census of Marine Life
    ...................................................................................................................



    This tiny, iridescent marine animal, called a zooplankton, is one of a dozen new species identified by scientists during the Census of Marine Life expedition conducted April 2006. This species is a member of the shrimplike copepods, which are among the most abundant creatures on Earth and a vital food source for many fish and marine mammals, including whales.

    Census of Marine Life sponsored the mission as part of its Census of Marine Zooplankton initiative, a ten-year study begun in 2000 to inventory the biodiversity of the world's oceans.

    The group plans to use the data it collects to assess the long-term effects of global warming, pollution, and ocean acidification on zooplankton, the critical first link in the ocean food chain.
    Photograph by Russ Hopcroft, courtesy Census of Marine Life
    ................................................................................................................


    This tiny sea snail, or pteropod, curiously resembles a Roman soldier's helmet. The specimen was brought up from the deep sea during last month's Census of Marine Life mission, conducted near the Bermuda Triangle.

    Because most sea life exists in the ocean's upper levels, few studies until now have focused on the region below 1,000 meters (3,281 feet). But scientists believe the deeper ecosystems may play a particularly crucial role in regulating the global climate.
    Photograph by Russ Hopcroft, courtesy Census of Marine Life
    .....................................................................................................................


    This tiny deep-sea snail called Atlanta peroni may be a bellwether of global warming.

    Increased levels of carbon in the atmosphere, caused by burning fossil fuels among other things, is known to elevate the acidity of deep ocean water. This spike in acid levels in turn inhibits snails from growing shells.

    The Earth's oceans and other bodies of water act as enormous carbon sinks that help regulate the planet's climate. Surface-dwelling plankton absorb carbon from the atmosphere and are consumed by animals called zooplankton, which come to the surface to feed and then return to the depths.

    This feeding cycle transports huge amounts of carbon from the atmosphere to the sea bottom, where the crushing pressure keeps it trapped.
    Photograph by Russ Hopcroft, courtesy Census of Marine Life
    ...........................................................................................................


    This baby octopus was probably using its large black eyes to search for a meal when it was snared by Census of Marine Life scientists last month.

    In addition to collecting zooplankton, worms, snails, and jellies, the expedition gathered over 120 fish species, including a young oarfish, a rare male anglerfish, and what may be a new species of black dragonfish.
    Photograph by Russ Hopcroft, courtesy Census of Marine Life
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Labels:


    Wednesday, November 11, 2009

     

    Beautiful South Africa

    This is a personal blog for owner's appreciation. For any readers who happen by: to fully appreciate the magnificent beauty of Steven Pinter's artistic photography, go to the original site at:
    http://www.getwonder.com/04/pictures-from-south-africa.html
    These small copies do not do justice to their beauty and to his artistry as a photographer.


































    http://www.getwonder.com/04/pictures-from-south-africa.html

    Labels:


    Archives

    May 2006   June 2006   September 2006   October 2006   December 2006   January 2007   February 2007   May 2007   November 2007   December 2007   January 2008   March 2008   April 2008   July 2008   August 2008   October 2008   November 2008   December 2008   February 2009   March 2009   May 2009   July 2009   August 2009   September 2009   October 2009   November 2009   December 2009  

    This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

    Subscribe to Posts [Atom]