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CREATION ART

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  • Photobucket Songs of Earth's Creations. In an endless cycle of eons she creates and destroys masterpieces, reusing her building materials to create anew. From death comes life.Photobucket
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    Saturday, August 16, 2008

     

    Graceful Glaciers - Rivers of Ice

    Slide Show Beautiful Glaciers

    Click title to view.

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    Glaciers Before and After
    Images from in and around Glacier National Park, Montana reveal dramatic melting over the years.

    BEFORE: Take a look at Agassiz Glacier, in this photograph taken in 1913, near Boulder Pass, Glacier National Park.
    AFTER: Compare it to this 2005 photograph of Agassiz Glacier taken from the same location (near Boulder Pass, Glacier National Park)
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    BEFORE: At the time the 1914 photograph was taken Blackfoot Glacier encompassed the current Jackson Glacier.
    AFTER: The 2001 photograph shows that each glacier has receded to the confines of its own cirque.
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    Arches National Park

    http://www.nps.gov/arch
    U.S. Department of the InteriorNational Park ServiceNational Park Service


    Arches National ParkDetail of Double Arch
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    Welcome to Arches!

    Arches National Park preserves over 2,000 natural sandstone arches, like the world-famous Delicate Arch, as well as many other unusual rock formations. In some areas, the forces of nature have exposed millions of years of geologic history. The extraordinary features of the park create a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms and textures that is unlike any other in the world.


    Esther and Ferol Stanley at Wolfe Ranch

    History & Culture

    People have visited what is now Arches National Park for thousands of years. Over time, many different groups have moved in and out of the area in concert with the availability of natural resources and the technology for exploiting those resources.
    more...
    Nature & Science

    Nature & Science

    The forces of nature have acted in concert to create the landscape of Arches, which contains the greatest density of natural arches in the world. Throughout the park, rock layers reveal millions of years of deposition, erosion and other geologic events.
    more...

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    Landscape Arch - Arches National Park

    Landscape Arch:
    Landscape Arch is in the Devils Garden section of Arches National Park, and is one of the world's greatest natural wonders. This arch vies with Kolob Arch in Zion National Park for the title of world's longest natural sandstone arch. Most observers agree that of the two arches, Landscape is the more spectacular.

    It is hard to believe that a piece of rock like this can exist. In its thinnest section the arch is only 11 feet thick, yet it supports a span of rock approximately 300 feet long. This arch could collapse at any time. On September 1, 1991, a 73-foot slab of rock fell out from underneath the thinnest section of the span, reducing the thickness of the span from 16 feet to 11 feet. On June 5, 1995, a 47-foot mass of rock fell from the front of the thinnest section of the arch, followed by another 30-foot rock fall on June 21, 1995. The short loop trail that went directly underneath the arch has been closed because of government liability should more rock fall.

    Landscape Arch

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    Wall Arch Collapses in Arches National Park

    Iconic stone arch collapses in southern Utah park

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/arch_collapses

    By MIKE STARK, Associated Press Writer Sun Aug 10, 3:26 PM ET

    ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, Utah - One of the largest and most photographed arches in Arches National Park has collapsed.

    This image provided by the National Parks Service taken Tuesday ...
    AP
    Sun Aug 10, 5:32 AM ET

    This image provided by the National Parks Service taken Tuesday Aug. 5, 2008 shows the collapsed Wall Arch. One of the largest and most visible arches in Arches National Park collapsed according to park officials. Paul Henderson, the park's chief of interpretation, said Wall Arch collapsed sometime late Monday or early Tuesday. The arch is along Devils Garden Trail, one of the most popular in the park. For years, the arch has been a favorite stopping point for photographers. Henderson said the arch was claimed by forces that will eventually destroy others in the park: gravity and erosion.

    (AP Photo/National Parks Service)

    This undated image provided by the National Parks Service shows the Wall Arch prior to it's collapse Monday Aug, 4, 2008. One of the largest and most visible arches in Arches National Park collapsed according to park officials. (AP Photo/National Parks Service) Collapse

    Paul Henderson, the park's chief of interpretation, said Wall Arch collapsed sometime late Monday or early Tuesday.

    The arch is along Devils Garden Trail, one of the most popular in the park. For years, the arch has been a favorite stopping point for photographers.

    Henderson said the arch was claimed by forces that will eventually destroy others in the park: gravity and erosion.

    "They all let go after a while," he said Friday.

    He said it's the first collapse of a major arch in the park since nearby Landscape Arch fell in 1991. No one has reported seeing it fall.

    Like others in the park, Wall Arch was formed by entrada sandstone that was whittled down over time into its distinctive and photogenic formation.

    The arch, first reported and named in 1948, was more than 33 feet tall and 71 feet across. It ranked 12th in size among the park's estimated 2,000 arches.

    Rock has continued to fall from the remaining arms of the arch forcing the closure of a portion of the trail.

    Officials from the National Park Service and the Utah Geological Survey visited the site Thursday, noting stress fractures in the remaining formation. The trail won't be opened until the debris is cleared away and it's safe for visitors, Henderson said.


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    Thunderstorms and Lightning - Intransient Creations

    Lightning and thunderstorms are not solid creations but nevertheless are creations of our planet.


    http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2006/1011-mysteries_of_thunderstorms.htm

    Mysteries of Thunderstorms
    Atmospheric Scientists Link Lightning to Ice Particles In Clouds


    Lightning: Fact or Fiction?

    To study lightning, scientists use rockets connected to the ground by wires. They fire the rockets into clouds, triggering electrical discharges, and. ... > full story

    October 1, 2006 — Satellite imaging is now helping atmospheric scientists link the amount of charged ice in clouds to lightning activity. Ice particles in thunderstorms can help increase precipitation, the scientists found. Different-sized ice particles within a cloud also carry a positive or negative charge, and as the particles collide, that charge builds up, leading to lightning.

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- There's no mistaking the billowing clouds, the noise, the rain, and the lightning of a thunderstorm. But why do some dark and ominous clouds form into huge masses of rain and lightning while others just pass us by?

    We'll likely see a big storm roll-in on warm days, but you might be surprised to learn thunderstorms are also filled with ice!

    "Ice plays a big role in the amount of rain that you see," says Walter Petersen, an atmospheric scientist at University of Alabama, Huntsville.

    He says ice in clouds is the key to really big electrical storms. Ice creates lightning and often heavy rain.

    "A fair amount of rain that you see over continents actually is the result of melting ice that's created high up in the, high up in the development of thunderstorms," Petersen says.

    Ice is vital to the development of lightning. Different-sized ice particles within a cloud carry a positive or negative charge. As the particles collide, that charge builds up. When the charge is released -- we see lightning.

    Satellites watch lightning flashes from space, helping scientists to learn more about them.

    "We know how much ice is associated with a given number of lightning flashes," Dr. Petersen says. "Then we can say something about the amount of rain that falls out of those clouds." Knowing the rain that falls was once ice above you -- a heads up about what's really inside a thunderstorm.

    BACKGROUND: Most people know that thunderstorms tend to form on warm days, but new satellite observations indicate that in order for lightning to form, thunderstorm clouds need to have a high content of ice.

    THE RESEARCH: Walter Petersen, a meteorologist at the University of Alabama, Huntsville, analyzed observations of lightning and precipitation from 1998 to 2000 taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRIMM), launched in 1997. The relationship between the number of lightning strikes and how much ice crystals are present in clouds is the same regardless of different atmospheric environments over oceans, coasts, and continents. The relationship between rain and lightning, in comparison, does not show this same level of consistency. The results support previous assumptions about the basic physics of lightning and ice. As a result, the density of lightning in a storm could be used in the future to predict the amount of ice that is present.

    HOW STORMS DEVELOP: Storm clouds form as moisture evaporates from the earth into the atmosphere, where the droplets jostle against each other. The air cools off rapidly with as it reaches higher altitude. Sometimes a cold front – the boundary between where the cold air from one thunderstorm meets the air outside the storm for example – will force the moist air upward into the colder air. This moist air cools off and the water vapor "condenses" into liquid drops, forming clouds. The process continues: more and more water vapor turns into liquid, and the moist air warms up even more and rises higher and higher. A thunderstorm results.

    WHAT CAUSES LIGHTNING? As more and more water droplets collide inside a cloud, their atoms bounce off each other more forcefully. This knocks off electrons. The ousted electrons gather at the lower portion of the cloud, giving it a negative charge, while the upper part of the cloud becomes positively charged. Eventually the growing negative charge becomes so intense that electrons on the Earth's surface are repelled and burrow deeper into the Earth. The Earth's surface becomes positively charged, and hence very attractive to the negative charge accumulating in the bottom of the cloud. All that is needed is a conductive path between cloud and Earth, in the form of ionized air.

    The American Meteorological Society contributed to the information contained in the TV portion of this report.

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